Cambridge English Southern Europe

Experts in Language Assessment

Practical classroom exam tips and ideas for the preparation of Cambridge English FCE No 1.

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Cambridge English Language Assessment UK and Bell ran a global competition inviting teachers of English from all over the world to submit written practical teaching ideas for preparing their candidates for a range of Cambridge English examinations.

We would like to share with you these teaching ideas as in a series of posts in our blog as we believe they are practical and useful tools to integrate into your classroom experience and will help to inspire you now and in the future.

This is the first post with teaching tips for Cambridge English: FCE.

Winner of the Teacher Competition 2012

Nora Beatriz Brussolo, Argentina 

Job role:
Teacher, Cambridge English: First (FCE)

Exam preparation idea for:
Cambridge English: First (FCE), Speaking paper, Part 2

Summary:
1. Collect pictures from different Speaking Part 2 practice tests and separate the pairs.
2. Divide the class into groups and distribute the pictures.
3. Place a picture on the table and ask the first group if they have a picture to connect to it.
4. Encourage students to find relationships among the pictures to justify their choice.
5. Ask the groups to take turns placing a picture. If they can’t place a picture they miss their turn – the winning group is the first to place all their pictures.

Materials needed:
Pictures from different Speaking Part 2 practice tests

Picture dominoes
“I take to the class lots of pictures from different Speaking Part 2 practice tests. I separate the pictures so that the students never get the pairs. I divide the class into groups and distribute the pictures among them. Each group should have at least two/three pictures. Then we play a kind of ‘dominoes’. I start by placing a picture on the ‘board’ and ask the first group if they have a picture to connect. The idea is that they should find relationships among the pictures to justify their choice and they will have to tell the class why they consider that picture could be paired off with the one on the board.

Once they are done, the next group tries to match one of their pictures with the last one placed. If one group does not find any reasons to match any of their pictures, the next group has a try. The teacher can ask the rest of the class if the reasons given are correct or else there might be a group of students playing the role of the judges. The group who gets rid of all of their cards first is the
winner. In this way they are forced to look beyond the picture itself and practise comparing and contrasting pictures.”

If you have any further teaching tips please submit these to: teachersupport@cambridgeesol.org

Written by Cambridge English Southern Europe

March 29, 2013 at 10:00 am

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